Thanksgiving

Within the next few days (November 22, 2018) we will be celebrating a holiday declared a national holiday in 1863 by President Lincoln. As we approach Thanksgiving this year, I know those who log into this site will be giving thanks to God with family and friends for the many blessings He has bestowed upon us.

Remember the words of the apostle Paul this week:

“I thank my God through Jesus Christ for all of you because your faith is proclaimed in all the world. For God is my witness, whom I serve with my spirit in the gospel of His Son, that without ceasing I mention you always in my prayers, … I long to see you, that I might impart to you some spiritual gift to strengthen you – that we may be mutually encouraged by each other’s faith.”

-Romans 1:8-12

NOBLE post of  “Kings” will continue after the 22nd.

Network of neighbors,

Online lessons and teaching

Believing and applying truth

Learning everyday and acknowledging our need

Examining eagerly to hear from God and respond in faith

 

Happy Thanksgiving

King Jeroboam

Kings – Jeroboam

 

Word Trilogy

Tear = qᾱra’ = cut, rend, split apart, slandered,

usually rending a garment in sign of grief or distress

Provoke = kᾱ ‘as = irritate, aggravate, exasperate, belittle, ridicule

Abijah = my father is the Lord [YHWH]

Each Day

Think about the words of Jesus as He quoted Isaiah in Mark 7:6-7 “This people honors me with their lips, but their heart is far from me; in vain do they worship me, teaching as doctrines the commandments of men.

 

First Impressions

In this section by looking to the Scripture for answers to the questions you will examine the text (of 1 Kings 11:26-40; 12:19-33; 13:1-34; 14:1-20 and 2 Chronicles 9:29-31) for an understanding. Read the entire passage before answering the questions. While we will not always answer these specific questions during group discussion they will provide a common starting point of understanding.

 

1. (11:26-40) Read 1 Kings 11:26-40 in order to answer the following questions.

a. What do we learn about Jeroboam in 1 Kings 11:26-28?

 

b. Who is Ahijah the Shilonite and what message does he give Jeroboam (v. 29-37)?

 

c. What promise from God (v. 38) is given to Jeroboam and how does this compare to the promise made to Solomon in 1 Kings 9:4-7?

 

d. How does Solomon react to God’s promise to Jeroboam (in v.40) and what is Jeroboam’s response?

 

 

 

2. (12:19-20) Ten (10) tribes and a portion of Benjamin rebelled against the rule of Solomon’s son, Rehoboam (v. 19).

a. Who made Jeroboam king (v. 20)?

 

Optional: How were kings chosen previously? See 1 Samuel 10:1; 16:13, 1 Kings 1:32-34, 39.

 

b. How many years does Jeroboam reign? (See 1 Kings 14:20)

 

 

 

3. (12:25-33) As king over Israel (the Northern Kingdom) Jeroboam makes some changes in 1 Kings 12:25-33. What 4 things does Jeroboam do as king of Israel with regard to worship (v. 28-32)?

 

 

 

 

a. How does Jeroboam make his decision, i.e., adviser, prophet, dream (v. 33)?

 

b. Why does he do this (v. 26-27)?

 

c. Were Jeroboam’s fears legitimate? Why or why not? Review 1 Kings 11:29-39; 12:24.

 

 

 

4. (13:1-10, 33-34) Read 1 Kings 13:1-10; 33-34 to discover God’s reaction to Jeroboam’s changes. What does the man of God from Judah prophesy as Jeroboam is making his offerings at the altar (v. 1-2)?

 

a. What sign did the man of God give (v. 5)?

 

b. What is Jeroboam’s reaction to the man of God’s prophecy (v. 4)?

 

c. What does God do and is this permanent (v.4)?

 

d. Why was the man of God required to refuse Jeroboam’s hospitality (v. 6-10)?

 

e. Does Jeroboam turn from his idolatry upon hearing the prophecy and seeing the miracles (v. 33-34)?

 

 

 

5. (14:1-20) Shortly after Jeroboam establishes his system of worship in Israel (14:1), his son, Abijah, becomes very ill. Read the account in 1 Kings 14:1-20.

a. What does Jeroboam do when his son becomes ill (v. 1-5)?

 

b. Why is the Lord “provoked to anger” with Jeroboam (v. 6-9)?

 

c. What does the prophet, Ahijah, say God will do as a result of what Jeroboam has done (v. 10-11, 15-16)?

 

d. What is the message from the prophet Ahijah concerning Jeroboam’s son, Abijah, and what in fact happens (v. 14:12, 17)?

 

e. The Lord allows Abijah (Jeroboam’s son) to be buried in opposition to His judgment in v. 11. What reason is given for the grace found here?

 

 

 

Going Deeper

This is an examination of supporting and related text to deepen your understanding of the passage you have studied (in 1 Kings 11-14 & 2 Chronicles 9) above and aid in group discussion.

 

6. Woven into Jeroboam’s story is an account of what happens to the prophet from Judah who prophesied against Jeroboam and his system of worship. Read 1 Kings 13:11-32. Consider the lessons you can pull from this passage and apply to today?

a. The man of God from Judah (who is unnamed) believed the old prophet from Bethel’s word. Did the prophet’s word contradict God’s word (v. 11-24)? What does this teach you? See also 1 John 4:1.

 

 

b. The old prophet from Bethel was in fact used by God to deliver a true word. Does this make him guiltless? See also Mark 14:21.

 

 

c. The old prophet from Bethel lied to the man of God from Judah. We are not told if the lie was intentional or unintentional. How does God view the message or ay message that is inconsistent with His Word (v. 18)?

 

 

 

7. Dan and Bethel are the locations chosen for the gold calves (1 Kings 12:25-33). Review what is said of these locations in earlier days of Israel. See Genesis 13:3-4; 28:10-22; 35:1-16 and Judges 18:30-31; 20:26-27. Why would these locations be important to Jeroboam? Look at a Bible map.

image from s1.zetaboards.com

 

 

For the Scholar

These questions will continue to illuminate certain themes in the passage and encourage background and/or understanding at a deeper level. Many are optional for group discussion.

 

Review question # 3 above where you described the 4 things Jeroboam did with regard to worship in Israel. This might remind you of another event in Israel’s history under Moses leadership. Read the 2 passages below and list the similarities and differences you find.

Exodus 32:1-10, 19-28

1 Kings 12:25-33

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

Discussion

These questions may be used for individual study, on-line comment or as group discussion in a Bible study group. Completion of the previous lesson questions (First Impressions, Going Deeper and For the Scholar) will be important before answering these questions. All discussion should be supported with Scripture. Please be prepared to provide the chapter and verse.

 

1. When comparing God’s promise to Solomon in 1 Kings 9:4-7 with God’s promise to Jeroboam in 1 Kings 12:38, what does this tell you about God’s priorities, His dealing with the kings over His people? What hope does this give you today?

 

 

2. Do the people of Israel bear any responsibility for the worship under Jeroboam’s new system? What should they have done when Jeroboam set up the gold calves? What should our response be to Church leaders who set up worship contrary to the Scripture?

 

 

3. Read 2 Peter 2:1-3 aloud. Why was the Judean prophet so strong with Jeroboam and then when the prophet from Bethel came along waffling? When should you follow the teaching of a self-proclaimed prophet? Are you to only cling to the written word? How should modern day prophets be received?

 

 

4. How do the sinful actions of Jeroboam differ from those of Solomon and how are they similar? How do the sins of Solomon open the door for the sins of Jeroboam? Do you think Solomon expected this to happen? In what way have you seen the sins of one generation open the door for the sins of the next in our modern-day culture?

 

 

5. Jeroboam reaches out to God twice for mercy even though he has “cast the Lord behind his back”. Is this an indication of repentance or seeking a relationship with God? Why or why not? What is the evidence that someone truly believes in Christ? Read Matthew 7:22-23 aloud; and explain how Jesus answers this question.

 

 

6. Jeroboam has his wife wear a disguise when she goes to see the prophet, Ahijah. Why doesn’t he approach the priests he has appointed over Israel? What does this tell you about his beliefs? Where have you seen someone (or yourself) act in similar fashion?

 

 

7. Jeroboam’s son, Abijah, seems to be most responsive to the Lord of all those in Jeroboam’s household (v. 13). God shows grace even in his death? If Abijah was pleasing to God but still died is death always, sometimes or never an indication that you have displeased God?

 

 

8. What are some of the teachings today that have crept into the Church that would be similar to Jeroboam’s sin? How have you seen combining the world’s teachings with Scripture’s teaching, change the Word of God to accommodate modern culture?

 

 

Each Day

Think about the words of Jesus as He quoted Isaiah in Mark 7:6-7 “This people honors me with their lips, but their heart is far from me; in vain do they worship me, teaching as doctrines the commandments of men.

 

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King Solomon Part 6

Kings – Solomon 6

 

Word Trilogy

Milcom = melek = king or High King

Hadad = sharpness, fierceness

Rezon = nobleman

 

Each Day

Remember the first 2 of the 10 Commandments: “you shall have no other gods before me. You shall not make for yourself a carved image, or any likeness of anything that is in heaven above or that is in the earth beneath, or that is under the earth. You shall not bow down to them or serve them” (Exodus 20:3-5a). Consider what these commandments mean to you.

 

First Impressions

In this section by looking to the Scripture for answers to the questions you will examine the text (of 1 Kings 11 and 2 Chronicles 9:29-31) for an understanding. Read the entire passage before answering the questions. While we will not always answer these specific questions during group discussion they will provide a common starting point of understanding.

 

1. (11:1-4) What do you learn about Solomon’s heart in 1 Kings 11:1-4?

a. What did Solomon know (v. 2)?

 

b. How did he know this? See 1 Chronicles 28:9, 10; 29:17, 19 and 2 Chronicles 6:14 also 1 Kings 9:4.

 

c. Who does the Lord compare Solomon to and in what way (v. 4)?

 

 

2. (11:5-10) What did Solomon do in 1 Kings 11:5-8 to make God angry (v. 9)?

 

 

3. (11:11-13) The Lord has given Solomon several warnings that he has apparently not heeded. What does God tell him He will do in 1 Kings 11:11-13?

 

a. Is this consistent with previous warnings in 1 Kings 2:3-4; 3:13; 9:6-9?

 

b. How was Solomon instructed by the Scripture (see Deuteronomy 7:1-4; 17:17)?

 

c. What mercy does Solomon receive in spite of his sin (v. 12, 13)?

 

 

 

4. (11:14-26) Explore how the Lord expresses his anger to Solomon as a result of his previous warnings and at not keeping “what the Lord commanded” (v. 10) in 1 Kings 11:14-26:

a. What does the Lord cause or bring about (the text says “raised up”) in v. 14a?

 

b. Who is raised up: in v. 14b-22 and what does v. 25 say is the result?

 

c. Who does the Lord “raise up” in v.23-25 and what takes place?

 

d. What else does the Lord do in v. 26?

 

e. How do these things effect the people in Israel? See also 1 Kings 12:19, 20b.

 

 

5. (11:41-43) List the things you learn about Solomon from 1 Kings 11:41-43 and 2 Chronicles 9:29-31.

 

 

Going Deeper

This is an examination of supporting and related text to deepen your understanding of the passage you have studied (in 1 Kings 11 & 2 Chronicles 9:29-31) above and aid in group discussion.

 

6. Deuteronomy 7:1-4 says intermarriage with pagans will surely turn your heart after their gods.

a. Why is this a serious point? See Exodus 20:3-6 (in the Each Day of this lesson).

 

b. What does Jesus teach in Mark 7:14-23?

 

c. Verse 4 says “when Solomon was old …”; what does this imply?

 

 

7. Compare 1 Kings 11:1 with 1 Kings 3:3. What do you observe and what does this mean?

 

 

8. What do you learn about Israel’s history with the pagan gods that Solomon’s wives worshipped? See Leviticus 18:21; 20:2-5, Judges 10:6, 1 Samuel 7:42.

 

 

9. Read Hebrews 12:1-11 (in the NT) and record the practical advice given on how to “finish strong”. Did Solomon “finish strong”? What do you learn from Hebrews 12 that Solomon should have applied?

 

 

For the Scholar

These questions will continue to illuminate certain themes in the passage and encourage background and/or understanding at a deeper level. Many are optional for group discussion.

 

10. Solomon’s wives are specified (in 11:1) as coming from 5 major people groups. Describe where each originated and any pertinent facts about them.

Moabites – Genesis 19:36-37, Deuteronomy 23:3, Judges:3:28-29, 2 Samuel 8:2

 

Ammonites – Genesis 19:36-38, Judges 3:12-14; 10:6-9; 11:4-15, 30-32, 2 Samuel 10:6, 17-19; 11:1

 

Edomites – Genesis 36:1, Deuteronomy 23:7, 1 Samuel 21:7, 2 Samuel 8:14

 

Sidonians – Judges 10:11, 12; 18:7, 1 Kings 5:6

 

Hittites – Genesis 23:2-9; 26:34, Numbers 13:29, Deuteronomy 20:17, Judges 3:5, 2 Samuel 11:3; 12:9

 

 

Discussion

These questions may be used for individual study, on-line comment or as group discussion in a Bible study group. Completion of the previous lesson questions (First Impressions, Going Deeper and For the Scholar) will be important before answering these questions. All discussion should be supported with Scripture. Please be prepared to provide the chapter and verse.

 

1. Have you ever experienced knowing what you should do (because you know the Word of God) and yet you did not want to do it? Is this a divided heart? What did you do about this? What should you do to keep from having a divided heart?

 

 

2. Galatians 4:6 tells us “God has sent the Spirit of His Son into our hearts crying ‘Abba Father’!”. What will help us to guard our heart so that we do not follow Solomon’s example? You may wish to turn to one of the following passages: Proverbs 4:4, Matthew 15:18; 22:37, Philippians 4:7 as part of the discussion.

 

 

3. Often Christian parents will think that if they teach their children the Bible and provide Godly role models they will not fall away. Was this the case with Solomon? How does this fit into how you are teaching your children? What steps should you take or should you have taken that are different that you would share with a new parent? What guarantee do parents have? Include 1 Kings 3:4-15; 9:1-9 into your discussion.

 

 

4. What does God’s raising up Hadad, Rezon and Jeroboam teach us about God’s sovereignty in history and government issues? See Proverbs 21:1.

 

 

5. Does God’s judgment cancel His promises (v. 12, 13)? See 1 Kings 11:39.

 

 

6. Discuss what you have learned about the wives of Solomon. Did they have more influence on Solomon than the Word of God or his father, David? What is the lesson for you in this passage?

 

 

7. Did Solomon’s heart drift away from the Lord later in life or was there always a problem? Do you find anything in the first 10 chapters that hint Solomon may have had a heart that was “not wholly true to the Lord” (v. 4)? Discuss the reasons that make the events in 1 Kings 11 so important for the Church today?

King Solomon Part 5

Kings – Solomon 5

Word Trilogy

Build = bnh = to build, built, fashioned, have children, restored

Heart = lebab, lev = mind, will and emotions; the center of a person that controls behavior

 Cut off = karath = cut down, shear, destroy, kill

 

Each Day

Consider the importance of continually walking in repentance as you meditate on the Lord’s words to Solomon: “if my people … will humble themselves, and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven and will forgive…” 2 Chronicles 7:14

 

First Impressions

In this section by looking to the Scripture for answers to the questions you will examine the text (of 1 Kings 9 &10 and 2 Chronicles 7, 8) for an understanding. Read the entire passage before answering the questions. While we will not always answer these specific questions during group discussion they will provide a common starting point of understanding.

 

1.(9:2) First Kings 9:2 reads “the Lord appeared to Solomon a second time”. What was the occasion when the Lord appeared to Solomon the first time (I Kings 3:4-5)?

 

a. What did Solomon ask for (1 Kings 3:9)?

 

b. What was the Lord’s answer (1 Kings 3:11-14)?

 

 

 

2. (9:1-11) Read 1 Kings 9:1-11. What has Solomon accomplished? How long did this take (9:10)?

 

a. What is the tone of the Lord’s words to Solomon in v. 3-11 (encouragement, warning, etc.)?

 

b. What 3 things will Solomon lose if he does not heed God’s Word to him?

 

v. 7a __________________________________

 

v. 7b-8________________________________

 

v. 4-5 __________________________________

 

3. 2 Chronicles 7 is a parallel passage to 1 Kings 84. . There is a verse in Chronicles (2 Chronicles 7:13-14) that is not found I Kings 9. From 2 Chronicles 7:13-14, who is the promise given to? What conditions are given in order to receive the promise? What does the Lord promise to do if these conditions are met?

 

 

 

4. (9:11-23) As Solomon establishes his throne and government, 1 Kings 9:11-23 sums up his various activities in foreign policy, defense, religion, economics or commerce. Note how he works in each area:

a. What is Solomon’s relationship with Tyre (v. 11-14)?

 

b. What is Solomon’s relationship with Egypt (v. 15-19)?

 

c. What was Solomon’s relationship with the indigenous people (v. 20-21)?

 

d. How does Solomon treat his own people, Israel (v. 22-23)?

 

 

 

5. Why does Solomon build a house for his wife (Pharaoh’s daughter)? See 2 Chronicles 8:11.

 

 

6. Read 2 Chronicles 8:12-18. Does Solomon seem to be careful to follow the Law of Moses concerning sacrifices and worship?

 

 

7. (10:1-13) 1 Kings 10:1-13 contains an account that is not found in Chronicles. What was the purpose of the Queen of Sheba’s visit to Solomon (v. 2, 3)?

 

a. What was the outcome? What was her conclusion?

 

b. What did Jesus tell the Pharisees in Matthew 12:42 when they asked for a sign?

 

 

 

8. (10:14-29) What do you learn about the wealth of Solomon in 1 Kings 10:14-29 (see specifically v. 15, 21, 22, 25, 28, 29)?

 

 

 

Going Deeper

This is an examination of supporting and related text to deepen your understanding of the passage you have studied (in 1 Kings 9, 10 & 2 Chronicles 7, 8) above and aid in group discussion.

 

9. The Lord tells Solomon “I have consecrated this house that you have built, by putting my name there …” (I Kings 9:3). How does the Lord consecrate the temple? See 1 Kings 8:12 and  2 Chronicles 7:10.

a) The Lord warns Solomon about “turning aside from following Me” and not keeping His commandments. A consequence will be that the Temple will be “cast out of My sight … a proverb and byword among all people …” (1 Kings 9:7-9, 2 Chronicles 7:20).

What does Jeremiah see happening to the temple in Jeremiah 3:16?

 

What does the prophet Ezekiel see happening to the Temple? See Ezekiel 8:6; 10:4, 18-19.

 

 What in fact happened to Solomon’s Temple? See 2 Kings 25:13-17, Daniel 9:16.

 

b) Another consequence for disobedience will be that “I will cut off Israel from the land…”. What did Moses predict regarding the future of Israel in Deuteronomy 29:24-28?

 

c) Has God given sufficient warning to Solomon? To Israel?

 

 

 

10. In 1 Kings 9:3, the Lord said to Solomon, “I have heard your prayer and your plea”.

Review Solomon’s prayer (summarized below):

Solomon’s Prayer

2 Chronicles 6:21-39

If a man sins (v.22) Hear act and judge (v. 23)
If an enemy defeats us (v.24) Hear and forgive (v. 25)
If there is no rain (v. 26) Hear and forgive (v. 27)
If there is disaster, illness (v. 28) Render to each heart you know (v. 30)
If a foreigner prays (v.32) Hear and do (v. 33)
If we fight an enemy (v. 34) Hear and maintain our cause (v. 35)
If we are taken captive & repent (v. 36) Forgive your people (v. 39)

Read the Lord’s answer to Solomon’s prayer in 2 Chronicles 7:12-13, 15-16 (also 1 Kings 9:3-11), and note the details. Did the Lord address specifics in Solomon’s earlier prayer? Keeping in mind that many years have passed since Solomon prayed, what does this tell you about the Lord’s “memory”?

 

 

 

For the Scholar

These questions will continue to illuminate certain themes in the passage and encourage understanding at a deeper level. Many are optional for group discussion.

 

11. Solomon’s problem in spite of his great wealth and wisdom was a heart that was divided.  What can we learn from Solomon and from NT that will keep our heart from being divided? See the passages below:

a. What had Solomon learned from his youth? See 1 Chronicles 28:9; 29:17-19, 2 Chronicles 6:14.

 

b. What did Solomon know that he wrote to others about the heart? See Proverbs 3:5; 4:1-3, 23, Ecclesiastes 10:2, Song of Solomon 4:9.

 

c. What did Jesus teach in Matthew 12:33-37; 15:18?

 

d. What does Paul teach that God has done for our heart in Galatians 4:6, Ephesians 3:17?

 

 

 

12. How long did it take Solomon to build the Temple (1 Kings 6:38)?

How long did it take Solomon to build his own house (1 Kings 7:1)?

How long did Solomon’s building project take? Add a and b above or see 1 Kings 9:10.

If the Temple construction was complete in the 8th month (1 Kings 8:2) and the dedication took place in the 7th month (1 Kings 6:38), how long then after the temple was complete did Solomon hold the dedication?

 

How much time elapsed from the dedication of the temple and Solomon’s prayer to the Lord appearing to Solomon a 2nd time (1 Kings 9:2)? To determine this, add the time it took to build the temple (1 Kings 6:38) to the time elapsed before the dedication (from d above). Now subtract this number from 20 (1 Kings 7:1), which is the time it took for his building projects (1 Kings 9:10).

 

 

Discussion

These questions may be used for individual study, on-line comment or as group discussion in a Bible study group. Completion of the previous lesson questions (First Impressions, Going Deeper and For the Scholar) will be important before answering these questions. All discussion should be supported with Scripture. Please be prepared to provide the chapter and verse.

 

1.Consider Solomon’s prayer in 1 Kings 8 and the Lord’s response in 1 Kings 9. Why was there such a high price for Solomon’s sin, after all we all sin? Have you ever experienced distancing from God because of sin? Will you share a time? (Hebrews 2:1-3; 3:12-13; 6:1-8; 10:26-31; 12:25-29 may help as you prepare an answer.)

 

 

2. In 1 Kings 8 Solomon made sacrifices to the Lord, he held the feasts and prayed. The people had rest and Solomon accomplished all his plans (2 Chronicles 7:11). Would you say he was religious? Have you ever had someone refer to you as “religious” because you are a believer in Christ? How can you explain to someone how a relationship with Christ gives meaning to “religious” activities (such as prayer, Bible study, attending church)?

 

 

3. Have you ever experienced God answering a prayer many years after you prayed? Did you feel as you waited that you would never receive an answer? How does knowing the answer to Solomon’s prayer came 12 years after he prayed encourage you, or does it?

 

 

4. Discuss what you have learned from 1 Kings 9 and consider how the lessons could apply today: Should Solomon have given Hiram cities in Galilee and land as payment for his projects? Does Solomon have a proper attitude in using foreigners as slaves for his building projects?

 

 

5. How does the Queen of Sheba’s testimony about Solomon and his kingdom give glory to God? Can you think of other pagans who praise or acknowledge the God of Israel upon seeing His blessing of His people?

 

 

6. What is the difference between God prospering you and you working to prosper yourself (Deuteronomy 17:14, 16-17) What is the difference in working for salvation and God giving you salvation as a gift? How should the Christian view one in light of the other?

 

 

7. Consider the great wealth of Solomon described in 1 Kings 10. (You might also think of Abraham and how he used his wealth in Genesis 13:2; 24:35, Isaiah 51:2). Why does God give such great wealth to some? What responsibility does this bring?

 

 

8. How has God “blessed” America? Do you believe this blessing will continue? How can faithfulness to Him and obedience to the Word continue His blessings? How has God uniquely blessed you or your family for your obedience?

 

Each Day

Consider the importance of continually walking in repentance as you meditate on the Lord’s words to Solomon: “if my people … will humble themselves, and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven and will forgive…” 2 Chronicles 7:14

 

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King Solomon Part 4

Kings Solomon 4

 

Word Trilogy

Thick darkness = ’arpel = the thick cloud where God was

Listen = sma’ = receive our prayers

Foreigner = nekr = those outside of Israel, gentiles

 

Each Day

Keep before you this week the words of the psalms of ascent: “To you I lift up my eyes, O you who are enthroned in the heavens!” Psalm 123:1. “I lift up my eyes to the hills. From where does my help come? My help comes from the Lord…” Psalm 121:1, 2.

 

First Impressions

In this section by looking to the Scripture for answers to the questions you will examine the text (of 1 Kings 8 and 2 Chronicles 7:1-10) for an understanding. Read the entire passage before answering the questions. While we will not always answer these specific questions during group discussion they will provide a common starting point of understanding.

 

1. (8:1-11) Why did Solomon assemble the elders and leaders of Israel (1 Kings 8:1)? What event is taking place in 1 Kings 8:2? See also Leviticus 23:33.

 

a. What do the priests accomplish at this event (v. 3-8)?

 

b. Why might the author mention the contents of the ark in v. 9? See Exodus 16:16.

 

c. What is the purpose of the poles mentioned in v. 8? See Exodus 25:12-15.

 

 

 

2. (8:12-21) What was in David’s heart to do for the Lord (v. 17)? How does Solomon understand that desire to be fulfilled (v. 20)?

 

 

3. (8:22-26) How does Solomon begin his prayer of dedication (v. 22)? Why is there “no God like you [the Lord] in heaven above or earth beneath” (v. 23)? What does Solomon petition God for in his prayer (v. 25)? Does Solomon acknowledge a condition to answering his prayer?

 

 

4. (8:31-53) Solomon’s prayer anticipates 7 situations when Israel will need God’s grace or forgiveness (5 are due to sin). Fill in the table below describing the situation where grace is needed, the reason and the request Solomon makes of the Lord as a result of the situation. Additional passages in Leviticus are provided for some situations.

 

I Kings 8:31-53

 

Situation

 

Reason Given

 

Request of God

 

v. 31-32

 

 

 

 

v. 33-34

 

 

 

Lev. 26:17

 

v. 35-36

 

 

 

Lev. 26:19-20

 

v. 37-40

 

 

 

Lev. 26:25

 

v. 41-43

 

 

 

 

v. 44-45

 

 

 

 

v. 46-50

 

 

 

Lev 26:33

 

5. (8:54-66) What does Solomon do at the conclusion of his prayer (v.54-61)?

 

a. How is the celebration of the temple construction concluded (v. 62-66)?

 

b. 2 Chronicles 7:1-10 is the parallel passage to 1 Kings 8:54-66. What takes place after Solomon’s prayer that is not found in 1 Kings 8?

 

 

 

Going Deeper

This is an examination of supporting and related text to deepen your understanding of the passage you have studied (in 1 Kings 8 & 2 Chronicles 7) above and aid in group discussion.

 

6. How does Solomon’s prayer in 8:31-53 recall the list of curses described in:

a. Deuteronomy 28:15-60; 30:1-10?

 

b. Leviticus 26:17, 19-20, 25, 33?

 

 

7. Does Solomon intend for the Temple to be a gift to Israel alone (v. 41-43)? What is its purpose for those outside of the covenant people? See Isaiah 2:1-4; 56:6-7?

 

 

8. Daniel teaches some things about prayer after all these things came upon Israel. Read Daniel’s prayer in Daniel 9:1-19.

a. What prompted Daniel to pray (v. 2)? Therefore his prayer is based upon

_____________________________.

 

b. Who is Daniel praying for (himself or others, v. 5, 6)?

 

c. What do you learn about God (v. 4, 7, 9, 12-16)?

 

d. What do you learn about man (v. 5, 6, 8, 10, 11)?

 

e. How does Daniel conclude his prayer (v.17-19)?

 

f. Do you find Solomon’s prayer comparable or in contrast to Daniel’s? In what way?

 

 

For the Scholar

These questions will continue to illuminate certain themes in the passage and encourage understanding at a deeper level. Many are optional for group discussion.

 

9. How was the Feast of Booths (Tabernacles) celebrated? Review Leviticus 23:33-42 and Deuteronomy 16:13.

 

a. What sacrifices were to be made at the feast according to Numbers 29:12-39? How does this compare to the sacrifices Solomon made?

 

b. What ceremonies did Jesus participate in later history at the Feast? See John 7:37, John 8:12, also Isaiah 12:3.

 

c. Why was Israel to celebrate this feast (what did it look back to)? Leviticus 23:43

 

d. What does the feast look forward to? See 1 Corinthians 2:9, Hebrews 11:1,2, 13-16, 39, Revelation 21:10, 22-24.

 

 

Discussion

These questions may be used for individual study, on-line comment or as group discussion in a Bible study group. Completion of the previous lesson questions (First Impressions, Going Deeper and For the Scholar) will be important before answering these questions. All discussion should be supported with Scripture. Please be prepared to provide the chapter and verse.

 

1. In 1 Kings 8:20, 23-24, Solomon gives a speech then prays. Does he see himself as the fulfillment of the Davidic covenant? Is this actually the case? If not, who fulfills the Davidic covenant? When have you seen God’s faithfulness to you or His promises fulfilled in your life?

 

 

2. Note the basis for Solomon to approach God in prayer (v. 22). What gives you confidence in approaching God in prayer? Can you provide a NT verse that will encourage someone who struggles with this?

 

 

3. What prayer request do you have foremost on your heart at this time? Which of God’s attributes do you need to cling to as you ask and receive an answer to this prayer (i.e., lovingkindness, incomparability, keeps covenant, presence, etc.)?

 

 

4. Now consider how much of your prayer time or prayer focus centers around asking for forgiveness as compared to petitioning for things in this world. Are there any changes you need to make in your attitude toward prayer? How can Christians help each other with this?

 

 

5. Considering what you have learned in this lesson and your answer to the question above, write out a prayer (either personal or intercessory) incorporating the Scripture example of Solomon in 1 Kings 8.

 

 

6. Solomon’s prayer acknowledges that when Israel sins they will suffer the severity of God (v. 46). The intent, however, is to lead to repentance and restoration (v. 47-50). Have you experienced this in your life? In the life of your church? How might this apply to what we see with regard to changes in our culture today?

 

 

7. Read aloud 2 Chronicles 7:1-3. How does this remind you of the promise found in Acts 2:2-4, 36-39? How is the response of the people in 2 Chronicles 7:3 an especially appropriate response? How do you express your gratitude and Thanksgiving to God for His presence in your life?

 

 

8. What hope does Solomon give if we are found to be in sin and under judgment? Do you think this can be applied to a nation in modern times?

 

 

Each Day

Keep before you this week the words of the psalms of ascent: “To you I lift up my eyes, O you who are enthroned in the heavens!” Psalm 123:1. “I lift up my eyes to the hills. From where does my help come? My help comes from the Lord…” Psalm 121:1, 2.

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Digression from Kings

The Tabernacle

 

Each Day

Consider the words God said to Moses “let them make me a sanctuary, that I may dwell in their midst“.  Exodus 25:8.

 

First Impressions

In this section by looking to the Scripture for answers to the questions you will examine the text (of specified chapters in the book of Exodus)  for an understanding. Read the entire passage before answering the questions. While we will not always answer these specific questions during group discussion they will provide a common starting point of understanding.

 

The following passages provide a description (although incomplete) of the building of the Tabernacle and its furnishings. The goal of study is to understand the place of worship and sacrifice before the Temple (of 1 Kings 5-7) was built. You may wish to draw a diagram of the Tabernacle as you go along.

1. From Exodus 25:1-7, what materials were collected for the Tabernacle and who made the contribution?

 

2. Read Exodus 26:30-38. How was the Tabernacle constructed?

 

3. Read Exodus 27:1-8 and describe the altar that is discussed in this passage. Where was it located? (See Exodus 27:9.) What does Leviticus 4:7-10, 18 say the altar is used for?

 

4. Read Exodus 30:17-21 and describe the basin and its function. Where was it located? (See Exodus 38:8.)

 

5. Exodus 25:23-30 describes a piece of furniture within the Holy Place of the Tabernacle. Give a brief description.  What was its purpose? See Leviticus 24:5-9. Why would this be important to the Israelites? (Hint: see Genesis 18:1-8.)

 

6. Exodus 25:31-40 describes the lampstand in the Holy Place of the Tabernacle. How would you describe it? How does Genesis 2:9 explain why it was pictured this way?

 

7. Exodus 30:1-10 describes a 2nd altar within the Tabernacle. What was the purpose of this altar? How does it compare with the altar or bronze (in #3 above)? Where is this altar located?

 

8. Exodus 25: 10-22 calls for the making of an ark. What was to be placed inside? What was to be placed on top? What is the purpose of the ark?

 

 

Going Deeper

This is an examination of supporting and related text to deepen your understanding of the passages you have studied (in Exodus) above and aid in group discussion.

 

9. Consider what you have learned from the passages in Exodus in light of the new covenant. Think about what each item in the Tabernacle pictures in the NT.

a. What does the bronze altar point to according to Luke 5:32, Acts 17:30-31, Romans 5:6, Hebrews 12:28?

 

b. What does the basin point to according to Ephesians 5:26, 1 Peter 3:21, 1 John 2:1-2?

 

c. What is the importance of the Table of Bread as you review John 6:32-35, Acts 2:42, 1 Corinthians 11:26?

d. What does the Lampstand point to according to John 8:12, 2 Corinthians 4:4?

 

e. How is the altar of incense picture in Revelation 5:8; 8:3-4. See also 1 Thessalonians 5:17.

 

10. The Ark and the Mercy Seat were in the inner most portion of the Tabernacle (within the  Most Holy Place). How does Romans 5:1-6 explain what Christ did for us? See also Mark 15:37-39.

 

 

For the Scholar

These questions will continue to illuminate certain themes in the passage and encourage understanding at a deeper level. Many are optional for group discussion.

 

11. Review the previous lesson (Solomon Part 3) and describe as many differences as you can between the Tabernacle and Solomon’s Temple. How are they similar? Are there any ways in which they are identical?

 

 

 

12. Read Hebrews 8. Why is the new covenant “more excellent” than the old?

 

 

Discussion

These questions may be used for individual study, on-line comment or as group discussion in a Bible study group. Completion of the previous lesson questions (First Impressions, Going Deeper and For the Scholar) will be important before answering these questions. All discussion should be supported with Scripture. Please be prepared to provide the chapter and verse.

 

1.How do you see the importance of the bronze altar? Why was it the first item for Israel to come to (most accessible) in the Tabernacle?

 

2. How have you been washed clean (Hebrews 10:19-22)?

 

3.What is the bread of presence? How is it remembered in your church?

 

4. Describe your favorite lamp in your home. Why is it your favorite? What dos the lamp signify for Israel? What does lamp within the Tabernacle signify for the early church?

 

5. What does the use of incense at the altar within the Tabernacle’s Holy Place signify? How do you keep the  incense of prayer burning in your busy life?

 

6. How does the ark signify the relationship of Israel to God? What is a reminder for you of God’s past actions and presence in your life?

 

7. What does it mean that Jesus is your High Priest?

 

 

Each Day

Consider the words God said to Moses “let them make me a sanctuary, that I may dwell in their midst“.  Exodus 25:8.

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King Solomon Part 3

Solomon Part 3

 

Word Trilogy

Boaz = bṑ az = in Him is strength, inherent strength or by God is the king mighty

Jachin = yᾱkhin = God will establish or may He establish

Inner sanctuary = naos (GR) = Most Holy Place, the most inaccessible area within the Temple

 

Each Day

Think about how Jesus drove the money-changers and sellers of animals out of the Temple. Jesus said to them “it is written, ‘My house shall be called a house of prayer’ but you have made it a den of robbers”. Matthew 21:13

 

First Impressions

In this section by looking to the Scripture for answers to the questions you will examine the text (of 1 Kings 5 – 7) for an understanding. Read the entire passage before answering the questions. While we will not always answer these specific questions during group discussion they will provide a common starting point of understanding.

 

1. (5:1-18) Read through 1 Kings 5 making note of the major theme.

a. Who is Hiram and what is his relationship to David and Solomon? See 2 Samuel 5:11.

b. What does Hiram agree to give Solomon and what does he want in return (v. 7-11)?

c. 2 Chronicles 2 is a parallel passage but there are a few details in this chapter that are not found in 1 Kings 5. What other things do you learn from:

v. 4-6

 

v.7, 13

 

v. 17

 

2. What character is introduced in 2 Chronicles 2:13 (also mentioned in 1 Kings 7:13-14) and what do you learn about him?

 

 

3. (6:1 – 38) Read through 1 Kings 6 making note of any facts that you find interesting.

a. How long had Solomon been king when he began to build the Temple?

b. How long did it take him to complete building the Temple?

c. Where was the Temple built according to 2 Chronicles 3:1?

 

 

4. (6:1, 37-38) 1 Kings 6 begins and ends with a date. What event occurs in v. 1? What is recorded in v. 37-38?

 

 

 

5. (7:1-12) What 5 structures are mentioned in this passage that Solomon builds?

  • v. 2-5

 

  • v. 6

 

  • v. 7

 

  • v. 8(a)

 

  • v. 8(b)

 

What is striking about the construction detail recorded in v. 9-12?

 

 

 

6. (7:13-47) List the Temple furnishings that are described in 1 Kings 7:13-47.

  • v. 15-22

 

  • v. 22-26

 

  • v. 27-37

 

  • v. 38-39

 

  • v. 40-47

 

What additional items are described in v. 48-51?

 

 

 

Going Deeper

This is an examination of supporting and related text to deepen your understanding of the passage you have studied (in 1 Kings 5 – 7) above and aid in group discussion.

 

7. How many times is Solomon encouraged or exhorted to remain faithful to God and who is encouraging him to remain faithful? See 1 Kings 2:1-4; 3:14, 6:12-13; 8:23-26; 9:2-7.

 

 

 

8. What was significant about the Temple’s location? See Genesis 22:2, 1 Chronicles 21:28; 22:1-5 and 2 Chronicles 3:1.

 

Where is the Temple located today? See John 4:19-24, 1 Corinthians 6:19-20, 2 Corinthians 5:1-10?

 

 

 

9. What was the purpose of the Temple according to 1 Kings 6:11-13? What happens to the Temple in the new covenant according to Ephesians 2:2-22 and Hebrews 8:1-13?

 

 

For the Scholar

These questions will continue to illuminate certain themes in the passage and encourage understanding at a deeper level. Many are optional for group discussion.

 

10. Investigate the differences between the Tabernacle and Solomon’s Temple with regard to the actual structure as well as the designers/builders (items in column 1 in the table below).

Tabernacle Temple
Size Exodus 27:12-18 1 Kings 6:2-3
Barrier of Most Holy Place Exodus 26:31-33 1 Kings 6:16,31
Location of Altar of Incense Exodus 30:1, 6 1 Kings 6:22
Lampstands Exodus 25:31-40 1 Kings 7:49, 2 Chronicles 4:7
Tables of Bread Exodus 25:23-30 2 Chronicles 4:8
Role of God Exodus 25:8, 9, 40 1 Kings 5:5
Participation of Israel Exodus 28:3; 35:29 1 Kings 5:13, 2 Chronicles 2:17, 18; 28:3; 35:29
Craftsmen / builders Exodus 36:1-5 1 Kings 7:13, 2 Chronicles 2:11, 13-14

 

Differences

Size

 

Barrier of Most Holy Place

 

Location of Altar of Incense

 

Lampstands

 

Tables of Bread

 

Role of God

 

Participation of Israel

 

Craftsmen / builders

 

 

 

Discussion

These questions may be used for individual study, on-line comment or as group discussion in a Bible study group. Completion of the previous lesson questions (First Impressions, Going Deeper and For the Scholar) will be important before answering these questions. All discussion should be supported with Scripture. Please be prepared to provide the chapter and verse.

 

1. The writer gives more detail to the Temple than the other buildings (of chapter 7). What does this lead us to see about worship of God? What did the Temple really represent?

 

 

2. How does the Israelite contribution to the Tabernacle compare with 1 Kings 5:13-14, 17? Have you ever had to force others to do things in order to get things done? What feelings did this evoke? (See question # 10 above.)

 

 

3. What message from the Lord (1 Kings 6:12-13) interrupts the building narrative? What does this teach us about building the Church? How can we implement this in a practical way?

 

 

4. Why would Solomon have made changes from the Tabernacle to the Temple construction? Discuss several thoughts and consider why the Temple was built as part of or connected to the royal complex.

 

5. Are church buildings today as important as Solomon’s Temple? Why? What percentage of your church’s resources go to building facilities compared to the percentage that goes toward missions or the poor? Is the Church of Jesus Christ a building or the people who gather to worship? What does the building of the Temple tell you about where our money, time, talent should be invested?

 

 

6. How many years after the exodus does Solomon build the Tabernacle? 2 Peter 3:8, 9 reads “with the Lord one day is as a thousand years, and a thousand years as one day. The Lord is not slow to fulfill His promise as some count slowness, but is patient toward you, not wishing that any should perish, but that all should reach repentance.” What does this tell you about the wisdom of God?

 

7. How does the Lord’s exhortation to Solomon about personal responsibility encourage you? What does it tell you about a leader’s responsibility? How should you pray for your church leadership?

 

8. Why does the writer of 1 Kings give so many (tedious) details about the Temple construction? Does this tell the Church today anything about our worship? Is our worship too casual or flippant? If so how can be changed?

 

 

Each Day

Think about how Jesus drove the money-changers and sellers of animals out of the Temple. Jesus said to them “it is written, ‘My house shall be called a house of prayer’ but you have made it a den of robbers”. Matthew 21:13

 

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King Solomon Part 2

Solomon Part 2

 

Word Trilogy

Understanding = binah = to listen, hear and obey

Wisdom = hkham = perfect comprehension of all that is

or might be (when pertaining to God)

Wisdom = hkham = an able mind, shrewdness (when pertaining to man)

Each Day

Wisdom comes from God and is found in Jesus Christ. As you study, consider the words of 2 Timothy 3:15: “the sacred writings [Scripture] are able to make you wise for salvation through faith in Christ Jesus”.

 

First Impressions

In this section by looking to the Scripture for answers to the questions you will examine the text (of 1 Kings 3 and 4) for an understanding. Read the entire passage before answering the questions. While we will not always answer these specific questions during group discussion they will provide a common starting point of understanding.

 

1. (Note) The book of 2 Chronicles was written later than the book of 1 Kings. Within the two (2) books we find many parallel accounts. However, the books of 1 & 2 Chronicles seem to be written with the purpose of exhorting and encouraging the Israelites returning to the land from Babylonian captivity.

(1:6-8) From 1 Kings 3:2-5 what is Solomon doing and why? See also 2 Chronicles 1:1-6

a. What was the result (v. 5)?

b. How does Solomon begin his prayer (v. 6-8)?

 

 

 

2. Read 1 Kings 3:9-14 and 2 Chronicles 1:7-12. Compare Solomon’s request of the Lord and the Lord’s response.

  1 Kings 3 2 Chronicles 1
Solomon’s petition v. 9

 

 

v. 10

 

 

The Lord’s answer v. 11-14

 

 

v. 11-12

 

 

 

3. Many have heard the story of Solomon’s wisdom found in 1 Kings 3. Read v. 16-28 and summarize the account in your own words.

 

 

 

4. In 1 Kings 3 we have seen that God promised to give Solomon wisdom. How do you see that promise fulfilled in 1 Kings 4:2-19?

 

 

5. (4:20-25) What is the result of the way that Solomon organized his rule (v. 20, 24-25)? What does this tell you about order and provision with respect to wisdom?

 

 

6. (4:22-28) What did the prophet Samuel tell Israel when they asked for a king (prior to this Israel was ruled by the judges)? See 1 Samuel 8:10-17.

 

 

 

7. How does the author of Chronicles present Solomon’s wealth in 2 Chronicles 1:14-17 and what do you conclude?

 

 

 

8. Review 1 Kings 4:29-34. Where does Solomon gain his wisdom (v. 29)?

 

a. How is the wisdom of Solomon compared with the conventional wisdom of his day (v. 29-34)?

 

b. What makes the wisdom of Christ different from wisdom and knowledge of this world according to 1 Corinthians 1:18; 2:6-10?

 

 

Going Deeper

This is an examination of supporting and related text to deepen your understanding of the passage you have studied (in 1 Kings 3 & 4) above and aid in group discussion.

 

9. How is the “wisdom from above” described in James 3:17-18? How is this kind of wisdom demonstrated by Jesus in each passage below?

a. Matthew 26:47-56

 

b. Mark 14:53-65

 

c. Mark 15:1-5, 16-20

 

 

 

10. How do people respond to Solomon’s wisdom in 1 Kings 3:28? What is the scope of Solomon’s wisdom in 1 Kings 4:29-30? Compare this to Mark 1:21-28 and Luke 2:41-52.

 

 

 

11. As we consider 1 Kings 4:20-28, note the fulfillment of God’s covenant promises. Describe how (a.) v. 20; 21 and (b.) v. 24; (c) v. 25 fulfill at least 3 promises that were made in the following:

a. Genesis 22:17

 

b. Exodus 23:31, Joshua 1:4

 

c. 2 Samuel 7:10-11 (also Micah 4:4)

 

Why is this important?

 

 

 

For the Scholar

These questions will continue to illuminate certain themes in the passage and encourage understanding at a deeper level. Many are optional for group discussion.

 

12. Explore the history of the city of Gibeon. Read Joshua 9:1-17; 10:2; 11:19 and note how Gibeon becomes part of Israel. What happens to the people of Gibeon? How are they treated differently than the rest of those in Canaan? Read also 2 Samuel 2:8-17. Why did Solomon go to Gibeon to make sacrifice according to 1 Kings 3:4?

 

 

 

 

Discussion

These questions may be used for individual study, on-line comment or as group discussion in a Bible study group. Completion of the previous lesson questions (First Impressions, Going Deeper and For the Scholar) will be important before answering these questions. All discussion should be supported with Scripture. Please be prepared to provide the chapter and verse.

 

1. Why did Solomon marry Pharaoh’s daughter (1 Kings 3:1) at this time? Was this wise, weak or the beginning of his unfaithfulness? (hint: see also Exodus 34:11-16, Deuteronomy 7:1-5.)

 

 

2. Why is pleasing God the proper objective of prayer (v. 10)? Would you describe Solomon’s prayer as intercessory or a personal request?

 

 

3. If you were in Solomon’s position, would you have asked for wealth, power or freedom from your enemies rather than wisdom to lead? Why?

 

 

 

4. Consider these aspects of Solomon’s prayer: petitioning a God who is generous, who is faithful, who cares for His people collectively and has the goal of pleasing Him. Using these as a model, write a prayer that you will share.

 

 

 

5. How do you think you would have handled the 2 prostitutes that came to Solomon with the baby? Fill in the blanks or complete the story giving practical examples of wisdom needed in our day.

 

 

 

6. Do you find any relationship between wisdom and riches? Why did God give Solomon both?

 

 

 

7. How are wisdom and obedience linked? Can you give an example from Scripture? (Hint: read Mark 12:28-34, Acts 15:6, 19; 17:22-31 for ideas.)

 

 

 

8. Discuss where the Christian gains wisdom regarding our salvation according to 2 Timothy 3:14-15, “But as for you, continue in what you have learned and have firmly believed, knowing from whom you learned it 15 and how from childhood you have been acquainted with the sacred writings, which are able to make you wise for salvation through faith in Christ Jesus.” What keeps our wisdom from being a point of pride as you read Philippians 2:13; 4:29?

 

 

 

9. James 1:5 tells us if we lack wisdom “ask God who gives generously to all without reproach”. What wisdom is needed in the Church? Discuss the wisdom needed today by those in authority.

 

 

Each Day

Wisdom comes from God and is found in Jesus Christ. As you study, consider the words of 2 Timothy 3:15: “the sacred writings [Scripture] are able to make you wise for salvation through faith in Christ Jesus”.

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King Solomon Part 1

Kings

Solomon Part 1

 

Word Trilogy

Solomon = shelōmōth = peaceable

To die = mût = to die

Established = kûn = to be or to make firm, to be established

 

Each Day

Think about the One who is established as King as well as Redeemer and Savior and how absolute His rule is regardless of those who would desire to have another rule. “The Lord will speak …saying ‘as for me I have set my King on Zion, my holy hill”. Psalm 2:6

 

First Impressions

In this section by looking to the Scripture for answers to the questions you will examine the text (of 1 Kings 1 and 2) for an understanding. It is helpful to read the entire passage before answering the questions. While we will not always answer these specific questions during group discussion they will provide a common starting point of understanding.

 

1. (1:1-6) What is Adonijah’s desire or goal in 1 Kings 1:1-6?

a. Why is this his plan (v. 6b)?

b. How does being an overly permissive parent factor into the goal of Adonijah? See 1 Kings 1:6.

c. Reading only the 1st portion of 1 Kings, chapter 1, it might seem that there was no clear plan of succession upon David’s death. What do we learn in 1 Chronicles 22:7-10, 1 Chronicles 17-19; 1 Chronicles 28:1-5?

d. Who does Adonijah and the men who align themselves with him really oppose?

 

 

2. (1:7-17)Who follows Adonijah and does not? Give their occupation and/or relationship to David when it is given in 1 Kings 1:7-17.

 

 

3. (1:11-48) One thing you may have observed in 1 Kings 1 is that the writer communicates through the speeches of his characters. Who are the characters making speeches and what is their position within the kingdom?

verses 11-14, 22-27

 

verses 15-21

 

verses 28-31

 

verses 32-35

 

verses 41-48

 

 

4. (1:49-53) Once Solomon has been made king, we read in 1 Kings 1 49-53 that “Adonijah feared Solomon” (v. 50). How does Adonijah’s fear cause him to respond in v. 50-52? What is Solomon’s response?

 

 

5. (2:1-4) How does David begin his final instruction to Solomon as he is about to die in 1 Kings 2:1-4?

 

 

6. (2:13-25) What is Adonijah’s request and how does he go about making this request? Review 1 Kings 1:1-4 and read 1 Kings 2:13-25.

a, How does Solomon answer the request (v. 2:23-25)?

b. What was Solomon’s promise to his brother, Adonijah in 1 Kings 1:50-53?

c. Does Solomon break his promise to Adonijah (v. 24-25)?

 

 

 

7. (2:24-46) 1 Kings 1:46 closes with “so the kingdom was established in the hand of Solomon”. How does Solomon firmly establish his position as king

In verse 24?

 

In verse 26-34?

 

In verse 35-46?

 

 

Going Deeper

This is an examination of supporting and related text to deepen your understanding of the passage you have studied (in 1 Kings 1 & 2) above and aid in group discussion.

 

8. (1:1-10) How does the description of Adonijah recall his brother in 2 Samuel 14:25-27 and a former king in 1 Samuel 9:2; 10:23-24? Does this teach us anything about physical appearances? See also 1 Samuel 16:7, Lamentations 2:15, 1 Peter 3:4

 

 

 

9. (1:32-33) Review 1 Kings 1:28-53. From v. 1:32-33, what is the symbol of Solomon’s claim as David’s successor? How does Luke allude to this in Luke 19:28-40? How was this predicted by the prophet in Zechariah 9:9-10? Why is this important?

 

 

 

10. (2:23-46) Our passage of 1 Kings 2 reveals the importance of eliminating enemies in the kingdom of Israel. Read Matthew 13:40-43, 2 Thessalonians 1:8-10. How will Christ finally establish the Kingdom of God? Where will anyone find safety and security in His kingdom? See also Psalm 2:6, 10-12.

 

 

 

For the Scholar

These questions will continue to illuminate certain themes in the passage and encourage understanding at a deeper level. Many are optional for group discussion.

 

11. For further study (optional):

1 Kings 1, 2 describe how Solomon will deal with a number of men known to King David and Solomon. Adonijah, Joab, Abiathar, Barzillai, Shimei, Zadok and Benaiah have their story told in 2 Samuel and 1 Chronicles. You may wish to review the history of some of these men and their relationship with King David.

Adonijah: 2 Samuel 3:4; 13:28-29; 18:14-15

 

Joab: 1 Chronicles 2:16, 2 Samuel 3:39; 8:16; 18:2; 20:1-, 22

 

Abiathar: 2 Samuel 8:17

 

Barzillai: 2 Samuel 17:27-29, 2 Samuel 19:31-39

 

Shimei: 2 Samuel 16:5-13

 

Zadok: 2 Samuel 8:17, 1 Chronicles 16:39

 

Benaiah: 2 Samuel 8:18; 15:18; 20:7; 23:20, 23

 

Nathan: 2 Samuel 12:1-15

 

Discussion

These questions may be used for individual study, on-line comment or as group discussion in a Bible study group. Completion of the previous lesson questions (First Impressions, Going Deeper and For the Scholar) will be important before answering these questions. All discussion should be supported with Scripture. Please be prepared to provide the chapter and verse.

 

1. Compare David (in 1 Kings 1:1-3) with what you know about Solomon at this point. How important was the Word of God to both men?

 

 

 

2. Considering how David’s parenting skill are described think about your children or parents. What parenting would you change at this point? What did you (or your parents do well (well = Biblically)? What things did you (or your parents) do that followed the culture rather than Scripture?

 

 

 

3. Discuss Nathan’s plan to intervene when Adonijah plots to take the throne? What is Nathan’s plan? Why would the prophet Nathan send Bathsheba to David? (Hint: 1 Kings 1:11-21)? Where do you see God’s role in Nathan’s plan? How does your faithful service prove important in the NT Kingdom of God?

 

 

 

4. What do you find interesting about 1 Kings 1:49? Read James 4:7 says “Submit yourselves therefore to God. Resist the devil and he will flee from you”. When have you seen this in your life?

 

 

 

5. As we read 1 Kings 2:1-4 was there a condition for David’s line to have a king over Israel? See also 2 Samuel 7:14-15 and 1 Kings 9:5.

 

 

 

6. Considering that Adonijah was Solomon’s older brother, was Solomon being too ruthless in having him executed? Why? You might see Romans 9:10-12 (quoting Genesis 25:23), Matthew 10:34-37 to help you with your answer.

 

 

 

7. Note Paul’s admonition to the Ephesian elders in Acts 20:17, 28-30. In this passage, Paul is warning of “fierce wolves” coming into the Ephesian Church. How would you define “an enemy within”? Why is it important to eliminate enemies within the nation? Within the Church today?

 

 

 

8. How would you apply the lessons of 1 Kings 1 & 2 if you were asked to advise the president or ruler of the country you currently reside?

 

 

Each Day

Think about the One who is established as King as well as Redeemer and Savior and how absolute His rule is regardless of those who would desire to have another rule. “The Lord will speak …saying ‘as for me I have set my King on Zion, my holy hill”. Psalm 2:6

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Welcome to NOBLE’s study of Kings

Welcome to NOBLE

“these were more noble “

 

The apostle Paul traveled through Macedonia, visiting Thessalonica and eventually Berea, a small town in the foothills of Olympus. When he arrived, as was his habit, he went to a Jewish synagogue. Luke describes the Berean’s in Acts 17:11 “Now these Jews were more noble than those in Thessalonica; they received the word with all eagerness, examining the Scripture daily to see if these things were so. Many of them therefore believed…”

 

The Bereans were not noble because they were part of the aristocracy. They were noble because they were open-minded to the truth of the gospel as taught in the Scripture. In Thessalonica “some believed”. The Greek word used for “believed” here is pathos which means to “be persuaded”.  What Paul taught went against their preconceived ideas and so Paul reasoned, explained and persuaded some of them. But in Berea, “many believed”. The Greek word here is pastrule which means actively believing, believing on their own. They eagerly received the gospel and diligently examined the Scripture daily. These noble people sought for themselves the truths of God’s Word and expressed an attitude of humble receptivity.

Our goal is to:

  • Study God’s Word with eagerness
  • Examine the Scripture daily
  • See for ourselves that the teaching is confirmed in the whole Bible
  • To believe and invite others to faith

 

What is NOBLE?

 

Network of Neighbors

Online lessons and teaching

Believing truth and applying it

Learning everyday and acknowledging our need

Examining, Eagerly to hear from God and respond in faith

 

As we study we will look for opportunities to apply what we have learned and be a neighbor to others.  Our study is to inspire Believing and grow Believers, not just learning facts but growing in faith. Our lessons are found online and can be used by Believers with all levels of prior Bible study. The flexible format allows study as your schedule permits. The goal is to spend some time everyday eagerly examining the Word of God.

Why Noble?

Why should anyone come to this site for study when there are many Bible studies in print and online today? While there are many good studies available if they become a substitute to careful study without examining the Scripture for answers, there is the possibility (even danger) of reading the answers of others. In order to be sure that we are not “swept along by every wind of doctrine” we learn from the Scripture alone because

None Other than the Bible Leads to Eternal life.

 In today’s culture we can become so used to predigested material that we miss the joy of discovering the truth of Christ through personal study of the Word. These studies are designed to critically discover for ourselves what the Bible teaches; the heart of faith is going to the Bible to learn and grow and this pleases God.

“…those who having heard the word with a noble and good heart, keep it and bear with patience” -Luke 8:15 NKJV

 

Join Noble by simply logging on to http://www.noblecourses.wordpress.com